Easter Blush

Easter is just days away and it has us dreaming in pastel tones — and mostly in BLUSH PINK. Remember Berkeley’s house and its exterior before/after? Well, her powder bath is about to get a paint job, too — and blush pink it is! Here’s some highlights from our blush-loving brains this week.

1. Go-To Blush Paints

For her bath, Berk’s jumping for Farrow & Ball’s Pink Ground. This hue is a dusty-toned blush pink but all the best ways. For the above office space designed for Garance Doré’s new LA home by designer Sarah Sherman Samuel, the duo settled on Quaint Peche by Sherwin Williams. Try Head Over Heels by Benjamin Moore for a softer, more subtle blush tone. Or, give Peaches N’ Cream by Benjamin Moore a try for a bolder hue.

2. Where the Blush Belongs

There really are no limits to where blush can bring beauty and that soft color pop. Blush in the bathroom, blush in the kitchen — blush in the bedroom or the patio.

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We really love the idea of blush in kids rooms, too. Like this space by designer Lauren Krieger — light blush walls layered with pops of white and bright pink.

3. Blush & Green

We’re loving the natural green tones Davidson’s Blake Pope brought into his bedroom design. His collection of aristic plants pop beautifully layered against his warm accent wall, painted in Peaches N’ Cream.

4. Blush Up the Accents

If you’re not ready to jump for blush walls, try incorporating some spring tones into your accents. Take this outdoor scene with pops of pink layered in. Another spot to bring in some blush is in your tablescapes — grab some fun napkins or accents for your upcoming Easter gatherings! Try these placemats or napkins to start.

Hop on over to Instagram to stay tuned to Berk’s bathroom blush refresh, featured on our design daily stories. Happy Easter!!

Let's Get Minimized: a Q&A

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We’re minimalists at heart over here and relish a good project where we help our clients peruse through what furniture to keep in a space — and what to pass on — so they truly LOVE their homes. We want their spaces to not just be beautiful but livable, and for them to display their most beloved items that tell stories about their lives. 

But let’s be honest, some projects we’ve come across involve a major decluttering — and that’s when we call in a local experts like Minimized so our design process can follow. We’ve followed Matlin Pessarra and her team and we loved talking to her this week, getting the inside scoop and tricks for not just decluttering a space, but creating a lifestyle of daily purging. Matlin is light-hearted and fun — she even laughed as she confided in us that naturally, she is a stacker — and has self-taught everything she knows about organization. 

Q: What first got you into organizing, a pretty niche line of work?

A: “I am originally from near Raleigh and have moved around a bit. I taught elementary school for four years and really loved it, but found myself becoming obsessed with organizing my classroom. I remember doing a lot of research — one of the reasons I love what I do so much is I am so interested in the psychology behind organization. If kids are going to learn, they need to feel comfortable and the classroom has to feel like home. Other teachers started asking for help on their classrooms and it just turned into helping people.”

Q: Is organization in your DNA?

A: “I am not naturally organized. I am naturally a minimalist, so I don’t have a lot of things which makes it easier to keep tidy —  but I am a stacker like no other. It has just been a process of realizing for myself that I need to stop that habit and create new habits. A reason I love working with clients is that I can relate to them so much. I understand that sometimes it is not natural and I love talking to people about incorporating new habits so you are not having to do a new clean out every month.”

Q: Do you find that your clients similar in their disorganization or the same?

A: “I have these four organizing personalities and all my clients fit into one of them. I call myself a stacker — a piler. Then there are shoppers, who are just people who buy too many things. Then there are the shovers —- their homes are so beautiful but if you open a cabinet or a closet something might fall on you. And then there are the solvers, the people who try to make solutions and have all these organizing supplies but they don’t have the system set up correctly.”

Q: What’s the biggest tidying habit you suggest incorporating into daily life?

A: “If there was one overall tip, I would say create a drop zone in almost every space to put those things when you realize you no longer need them. In the closet, next to your hamper, have another basket so when you try things on in the morning and think, “Why do I even own this?” instead of hanging it back up — you put it there. Get into that habit of setting things aside instead of putting them back. So you don’t have to do a huge purge, instead it’s something you are doing daily. With playrooms, I suggest working with kids and explaining to them that when they are done with a toy, they can put it in this basket over here and then it will go to another kid. Parents say that no way, their kids won’t do that but kids always do it! And then it takes work off the parents.”

Q: What projects are you hired most frequently to tackle?

A: “We definitely see a variety but our most popular spots are closets, pantries and play rooms. It’s pretty much any spaces that are behind closed doors where people tend to shove and not want anyone to into them.”

Q: What do you see as the greatest need in the minimalism/organization?

A: “The greatest need people have is realizing how to change their habits in order to get their homes where they need to be. A lot of people are not used to going through and purging and donating so they tend to get really overwhelmed and get to a point where they don’t even know where to start. I have to talk to clients about how once we come in we can help declutter but you have to keep up with it. Getting people to set up those cycling systems to have somewhere to put things to donate or set things aside is really important.”

Q: What’s your take on Marie Kondo style of organization?

A: “I love Marie Kondo! I’m glad it’s got people’s attention onto the power of decluttering. I get the whole sparking joy thing, but I have joked with so many clients about it — paper towels and batteries do not spark joy for me but we need them. Her whole style is a little extreme but I appreciate parts of it. I love that she talks about organizing by category instead of by room. Like if they want to organize their hardware or manuals —- she suggests one that she has one place for it all. Not one stack in your kitchen and another in your laundry room. And of course her folding! I just love that when I look in my drawers now I can see everything from there. It stops things from piling up and getting stuck in the corners.”

Q: What’s the biggest mistake you see that people make when trying to purge?

A: “One big one is focusing more on the supplies than the actual decluttering. Almost every one of my clients already has bins — a lot of people’s clutter is storage products. They are just creating more clutter.


Q: What’s a misconception about minimalism/organizing?

A: “One of the misconceptions I find a lot with clients who hire me is that as soon as I get there, they have an idea of a new system put in! They always jump to supplies or shelving or more cabinets — which will create more storage — but one of the things that people don’t realize is that they have to deal with the clutter first. If you go in and put in more bins you are just containing the clutter — you are really not organizing.”

Q: Your tagline is, "You don't have to do it all." I love that, can you elaborate? 

A: “The reason I stuck with you don’t have to do it all is that especially when I started the most popular question I got was: “Well, can’t people do that themselves?” Our time is worth money and energy and if you are not organizing every day and you don’t know the right process, you might spend weeks on one area where you could call people in and have it don in three hours. I am all about focusing on those things that are important to you!”

Q: What’s your organization process?

A: “The process that we follow can be different depending on the clients, sometimes we come in when they have just moved or are about to move or have been there for awhile. We have a three-step process that starts with minimizing, then organization and then styling. Minimizing is decluttering. We try to take every single thing out of the space, remove everything and begin to categorize and purge as needed. This step is the most time consuming, it totally depends on the client. As for organizing this is really space planning and we try to use products and space people already have! For styling, we will recommend some different products once we have gone through and purged and see what they have.”

Q: Which part of the process makes you come alive?

A: “Definitely the styling because I am seeing it coming all together! Almost every single time they say to me, “Are you scared? Are you overwhelmed by my spaces?” — but I love it! When I walk into an area that people may seem as messy I see the potential of what it could be and sometimes when we are going through the process you almost forget what is looked like so I love having the before and after!


Q: Do you have a go-to organizational item?
A:
“Something I use in almost every project is some sort of turn table. The Container Store has so many different types — plastic ones, bamboo ones, acrylic ones, but they are so helpful for so many different things. For example, for corner shelves or for under the sink — they are great so you are not having to dig through and things getting stuck in the back.”

Q: We often design playrooms -- what are your tips on keeping playrooms organized?

A: “I have a lot of thoughts on playrooms especially as a former teacher but something I talk to clients about a lot is how limited kids attention spans are. If you give them a bunch of options they are going to try to use every single option. You don’t have to have every single thing out and available. I suggest putting things up and away even if kids can see it but cant reach it but then they are asking for it and you are seeing what they are asking for and playing with.”

Q: Should every house have a junk drawer?

A: “Every one is going to have something that feels like a junk drawer. For example, I live in a small one bedroom apartment and in my kitchen I have some extra gum and lighters and candles and spare keys in a drawer — but they are not just tossed and shoved in. I don’t add to it — they all have their space. I think you can have a “junk space” without it feeling junky.”

Find out more on Instagram at @getminimized or visit Minimized.

HON's Full Service Design Process

At House of Nomad we believe in making the design process approachable with results that are authentic to our client’s personalities and lifestyle — and most of all, we keep design fun. Here’s a glimpse behind the scenes into House of Nomad’s full service design process. As an example, we’re pulling from a Dilworth cottage that we designed last summer. The clients asked for a refresh for their entryway, front living space and adjoining dining room. We hope this start to finish guide is a fun glimpse into this process and what it looks like for us and our clients!

STEP 1: Initial consultation

Once a client makes the initial contact, we set aside 1.5 to 2 hours to meet in person, talk about goals and get to understand their style. We see the space, take full measurements and photos and discuss their budget. Here’s shots of the Dilworth space the first time we walked through our client’s doors.

STEP 2: Design Time

Back in the studio after the consultation, we pull everything into a proposal to kickoff our design time. Our design time includes pulling together a design tray with swatches of paint, samples of fabric and finishes that we bring to the clients. Here you see leather and wood finishes for our Dilworth cottage project — sofa/chair choices, a wallpaper swatch, a rug sample and a textile option. Depending on number of rooms and project size, our team also creates a paint plan, 3-D renderings and space plans. This process typically takes 2 to 3 weeks.

STEP 3: Presentation

All of our full-service design presentations are done in person, where we review space plans and 3D renderings of our mutual vision of the space. Here’s the space plan and mood board from the Dilworth cottage project, which we reviewed with the clients along with their full presentation of paint, furniture, rug and decor options.

While this Dilworth project didn’t require 3D renderings, here’s an example of what that looks like for a recent Plaza Midwood client!

STEP 4: Project Managment

After the client approves the items on the presentation, HON sends over an invoice. Once paid, all orders are placed by our project manager who tracks them on a weekly basis giving clients updates on the status of each item. Once we nail down anticipated delivery dates, we gear up for our favorite day: INSTALL day!

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STEP 5: Delivery & Install Day

Install day is the climax of every detail and vision and conversation, where the client’s vision and all our details come to life! House of Nomad installs are typically done in one day, but at times (due to project size and item availability) are completed in two separate installs. We show up with our delivery team first thing in the morning and our installer gets to work doing everything from hanging drapery and light fixtures to assembling furniture and hanging chairs. Our delivery team places each rug and piece of furniture — and we come with our clipboard and install bag ready to go, prepped for all the details!

Here’s some favorites from the install day at the Dilworth cottage!

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6. Styling

Per request from our clients, we love to finish a project with styling. For styling, we pull from our inventory of items sourced all over the world and hand-select finishing touches for your space. We set aside an hour to two of design time to come in person and complete the space with potted plants and decor.

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7. Photoshoot

For an average project, from the time we begin a consultation to a completed space the time frame is 8-12 weeks — depending on the goals (painting/etc.). The last step for some projects is a photo shoot of the final spaces. And we were so excited that this Dilworth project was picked up by Rue Magazine! Follow the link for more images from this beautiful home. All final photos by Laura Sumrak.

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Florals: When To & When Not To

We’re fans of floral, it’s the truth. Give us a dark and moody floral wallpaper for a small space or to create an accent wall in all day long!

But to clarify -- we’re not in love with all floral. We have strong opinions and believe us, there’s a fine line between small prints that go towards prairie with a strong elderly vibe and those that speak modern beauty for a space. We are big fans of incorporating a natural element. In some cases, this can come in the form of wallpaper — think moody florals or botanical patterns! Here’s our best tips for when to use and when not to use florals.

1. Go Big or Not at All

The size of the print is the easiest way to balance it’s beauty. Small, tight floral patterns tend towards grandma -- run away!

Take this Myers Park bathroom we designed and just love, it’s timeless and just a tiny bit funky. But if the print had been smaller, the vibe would be completely different -- dated and not our jam. We would design this space again anyday.

2. Go Moody

While you might not think a small space is a good fit for a bit print, this bathroom proves the point. Surprisingly, windowless and tiny spaces are perfect for giant prints. The print creates cohesion and adds personality and interest.

If it’s not a small space you’re tackling, you can try wallpaper prints as accent walls (headboards in a bedroom, anyone?) in a bedroom, office, nursery even a kitchen or entryway!

3. Go botanical, not Floral

The truth is, we are all about the botanicals and less about the florals. We love the organic feel of florals and fauna mixed together in prints. Palms, tropical flowers, even some classic animals -- the whimsical, unexpected vibe is our favorite. These prints are less stuffy and timeless. More botanicals less flowers is really where are designs are headed. These prints feel more like art, more like a painting and less like wallpaper.

4. Go Abstract

Another way to stay modern is to jump for an abstract pattern -- like these Merimekko prints. We’re in love! While not perfect for every space, they are perfect for the right space and won’t go out of style.


5. Go Panel it Up

A good trick if budget is a consideration is to use judges paneling. Instead of papering an entire room or wall, paper just a section of the room by using paneling! This makes a custom art look without the cost of the entire space.

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Note: make sure before you fall in love with a print, you have a professional come and estimate how much you will need! Several rolls may be in the plans!  

Good luck and happy papering!







Studio Move in Day!

We are thrilled to announce that today we’ve set up shop in an Atherton Mill studio in South End! Keys in hand, we’re moving in.

To date, all our best design work has been done in our home studios — or most days, with a coffee in hand at our favorite Queen City coffee shops in between client meetings and installs. We’ve loved the local, small business rhythm this has given our days but have long dreamt of a space that allows us to center our creativity, provide a client experience that’s consistent with our brand and showcase some of our favorite design trends.

Not to mention, we love South End and Atherton Mill provides the perfect vibe and a dreamy space. It’s airy and modern and big enough to house inventory from our travels to showcase. While we just got the space today, we have big plans for a sample wall featuring our top vendors and go to vendors. The wall means clients will have an interactive component with the design presentation we couldn’t provide before, letting them touch and feel and see our favorite furniture lines, textiles and more.

This space will be a working studio for us both, giving us an established creative space where we can go and design — as well as collaborate with our growing team. In the last month,  we’ve added three part-time hires to our team. We’ve added an expert project manager, overseeing project details once our designs are in place, a PR manager handling our communications and social media, and a fabulous summer design intern handling all the happy details in between.

Plans are in the works to deck out the space in our dream designs, taking some risks with colors, wallpaper and pattern — anything we’ve been obsessed with for awhile. And, of course, we’ll incorporate findings from our trips — Mexico, Thailand and soon — Morocco.

Speaking of Morocco, we head there in mid October and plan to have a launch party for the space when we get back. Complete with cake and some bubbly and lots of exotic rugs and Moroccan finds. Expect that as well as trunk shows and parties and lots of fun in this space.

Come on by and see us — and don't mind the construction outside our front door. We’re the ones laughing and dreaming with the door wide open and Berkeley’s friendly pup Shelby waiting by the door. You’ll find us at 2108 South Boulevard, Unit 115, www.houseofnomaddesigns.com and as always, watch for party and trunk show details at @houseofnomaddesign on instagram.