Basket Wall Tutorial

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Art is tricky — and basket walls are the perfect art option that makes a big, beautiful impact. They’ve become a House of Nomad (HON) go-to and are versatile whether you want a playful wall with pops of color (like this Lake Norman craft room designed by HON) — or a monochromatic collection, keeping the baskets to natural and black. The baskets not only layer the room in texture, but also bring in the story of where the baskets were sourced into your space.

Take our word for it: basket walls truly are not hard! But, there also is an art to the order of the steps. We’re giving you all our best advice here, step by step — timelapse included!

Step 1: Wall Shop

The number of baskets you need depends entirely on the size of your wall, so start by selecting the best wall you’ve got to hang baskets!

  • Tip: Places we love to do a basket wall include the living room, a large installation in a craft room, above a console in the entryway, above a piano — or a more sophisticated grouping in a dining room.

Step 2: Basket Shop

More often than not, art is purchased too small for a space — so keep that in mind as you tally up your basket list. Don’t skimp on the baskets!

  • Trick: When ordering baskets, stick with odd numbers. A nice grouping can start as small as 3 — for a mini-space. For an upcoming HON installation, we have as many as 27 ready to hang! Make sure your baskets are all different sizes, usually 1-2 large and 1 small, with a few in between sizes. It works to have a few the same size, but try to vary for the best look. Keep in mind, you don’t want baskets that compete.

  • Source: Search “tonga baskets” on Etsy or for “woven African baskets,” and note that the ones that are wrapped tend to hold up the best! We love to mix in a few simple, monochromatic ones and then add in a statement basket or two. The statement could be in the color, pattern — or size.

Also, be sure to check out African wall discs, which are stunning! But get ready, those can be pricey!

STEP 3: Tape it Up

On a roll of kraft paper, trace the largest part of the circle and cut out each shape. Using green tape, tape them on the wall.

  • Trick: Don’t be afraid to do this step, just get taping! We typically start with the larger baskets, then fill in with the smaller ones. Start with them pretty tight, like you are forming a cluster.

  • Common mistake: The most common mistake with basket walls is that the baskets are too far apart! They should be tight knit, which creates a custom art-installation feel. Our favorite way to fight this mistake is to provide some overlap.

  • Tip: Before you commit to your pattern always STEP BACK from the wall and look at it from when you walk into the space. Walk in and out of the space and look at it from different angles. 

Step 4: Basket Up the Wall

Take it from our install team: the simplest and most secure way to hang baskets is to use finishing nails and push them gently through the front of the basket.

  • Tip: Look at the weave of each basket and in between two of the weaves, find that space where you can slide the nail, so that it won’t be visible. Hold the basket over it's corresponding piece of paper, press/hammer in the nail — and gently pull the paper off once it’s hung.

Happy basketwall hanging! Cheers to layered, happier spaces!

Stay tuned for details from our BALI trip, where we died an went to basket HEAVEN and sourcing ALL the baskets for the Queen City. Follow along with our adventures on Instagram, and we’ll post details for studio parties and pop-up sales soon!

HON House Tour: Americana Funk in Myers Park

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HON’s clients, Matt and Scottie Akins, are Charlotte natives who returned to the Queen City after having their first child in Jackson Hole, Wyoming — and purchased a home next door to HON’s Berkeley Minkhorst! Their 40s Myers Park home has integral history and charm but after numerous additions, they were left with a funky flow downstairs and came to HON to rework the design of the space.

HON’s goal was to take some of the Americana style the duo both loves, funk it up a bit and bridge the vibe to the rest of the rooms in their downstairs. HON created an entry point with industrial shelving to work as a catch-all for their family of four.

With now two young children in tow, HON’s living room design is family friendly with slipcovered swivels (a breeze to clean), a coffee table with a removable top for storage — and personalized baskets (one for each family member) that brings a little style and organization to their lives. A design favorite from this space is the vintage overdyed rug — a gorgeous, soft color palette.

The overall highlight of this design for HON is the graphic Cle tile in the bar area. A blank wall turned modern bar area pulls the modern design from the front door to the kitchen nook.

Matt and Scottie love to travel and requested incorporating HON travel finds from their space, which included black-and-white pottery from Fes, Morocco, and custom mudcloth pillows made in Marrakech in their kitchen banquette nook.

Matt and Scottie love to travel and requested incorporating HON travel finds from their space, which included black-and-white pottery from Fes, Morocco, and custom mudcloth pillows made in Marrakech in their kitchen banquette nook.

Not only were these clients fun to work with and neighbors of Berkeley — but HON is attached to this house because it was the former home of HON’s very first clients!

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For daily design inspo, follow along on our Instagram!

Plant Care: Q&A with Kelly from Malone's Greenhouse

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It’s no secret that House of Nomad is CRAZY about plants! Last weekend we hosted our first ever Potting Party and collaborated with our friends at Malone’s Greenhouse to create a plant care guide that gives the tricks of the trade for plants from low to high maintenance, with tips on how often to water, what kind of light each plant needs and more. Click here for the FREE, printable guide!

For those wanting to take an even deeper dive into plants, check out this Q&A with Kelly from Malone’s. We’ve been longtime fans of Malone’s and not only did she teach our Potting Party — but you can often find a member of our team scouring their rows of gorgeous plants for clients! Here’s the inside look on our talk with Kelly — and her fantastic knowledge of plant care.

Q: Do you put your plants in the shower to water them?

A: “If you come up to me and say I’m thirsty and I throw a cup of water at you, it wouldn’t really fix the situation. That’s what it is like when you just pour water on a plant. I like to put my plants in the shower and set them down in water and gently mist them. It cleans off the dust and gives them a good drink of water.”


Q: What’s your go-to house plant recommendation?

A: “If you are looking for an easy plant to start with — snake plants and aloe are wonderful, both low light and low water and both purify the air.”


Q: What plant requires the least water?

A: “The snake plant is the lowest water requiring plant, that’s why they are really easy! For a 4” pot, you can water every couple weeks or for a 6-8” pot — just once a month. The bigger the pot, the longer it takes to dry out. One tip, snakes don’t like cold or moisture on leaves so don’t mist them. They’re also great because they naturally purify the air!”

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Q: How do you care for a fiddle leaf fig?

A: “Let it get completely dry before you water it, but when you do water you want to soak it. They need bright light, and can handle a bit of morning sun or late evening sun but no middle of the day (11 to to 3 p.m.). Try a south or west facing window, which are the brightest and warmest.


Q: Any tips on troubleshooting the right amount of water for fiddle leaf figs?

A: “Fiddles tell you if they are over or under watered! If the very edges of leaves turn brown — it is too dry. It means they are pulling moisture from ends of tips of plants. But if it get black splotches on the leaves, that means too much water. Try a moisture reader to maintain proper moisture.”

Q: How do you help your cactus to thrive?

A: “Make sure to not overwater, especially if they are not in bright sun. For a 2” to 4” pot, water once a week; for a 6” to 8” pot, water every couple weeks; for 10” pot, water once a month. Also, they do best in full sun (kept right in the windowsills), they can handle bright light instead.”


Q: Do cacti really have a winter season?

A: “Yes! In the wintertime, you will only water only once or twice! This is where many people go wrong, continuing on in their regular watering schedule and their succulents rot during colder months.”


Q: How do you know when to repot a cactus?

A: “For cacti, you don’t have to repot until they are so large they are outgrowing the container. As a general rule, once you pot a cactus it can stay in the same pot for several years.”

Q: How can you tell if a plant is still alive?

A: “If you ever have a plant and wonder if it is salvageable or not, use your fingernail to scrape the bark and see if it’s green inside.”

Q: What plants purify the air?

A: “Someone told me their husband was snoring and the doctor told them to buy a snake plant and put it in their room! It adds oxygen to the air and helps them to sleep better. Another great plant to purify the air is a spider plant.”


Q: What’s the story behind the flying saucer plant?

A: “The Chinese Penny Plant has become so popular — it’s also called a flyer saucer plant because it looks like a saucer flying in the sky. Penny plants do not like the cold. The first year we had that one, we were afraid to put it in the sun and leaves turned yellow because they got too much water. We moved them to a warmer, sunnier spot and they jumped and started growing. They need a bright, warm and sunny spot. Let them get dry before you water them."


Q: How should you pot ferns?

A: “Plant ferns in a pot without a drain hole in the bottom. While most plants need a hole to drain, ferns need to stay really moist. You can even plant perennial maidenhair ferns outside in Charlotte! They do well outside.”

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Q: Do you have any go-to house plants specific to the spring and summer?

A: “A hanging pitcher plant helps with the fruit flies in the summer! Place one in your kitchen or near a trashcan and within a couple of days, the plant takes care of the pesky problems!”

Thanks to Kelly for her plant advice and all the life her plant babies have added to our designs — and for teaching on last weekend’s Potting Party at our Studio!

For daily plant design inspo, follow along with Malone’s Greenhouse!

And don’t forget to check out the FREE Plant Care Guide we created with Malone’s, just download and print!

HON House Tour: Dilworth Bungalow Bar

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Five years ago, House of Nomad clients (Sydney and Kendall) purchased a bungalow in Dilworth and recently asked for help with their living room and bar space design. The goal was to maximize seating and create a cohesive design for a dual purpose: entertaining and family nights. Both medical professionals (one in anesthesiology school and the other a pediatric resident director), their family dynamic is lighthearted, with lots of laughter and conversation, and they have an open door policy — whether it’s their kids and their friends or colleagues and neighbors, they love entertaining.

In the bar area, Berk and Kell played on the existing navy walls making it feel even more intimate by incorporating the textured rug and velvet drapery. Then, the duo layered other elements through framed textiles, mudcloth pillows and a pop of brass. As finishing touches, Kendall’s collection of vintage barware were incorporated — coop glasses and a shot dispenser from the 1920s. A loveseat was added as well as cocktail table to maximize seating so there was more than enough room for friends. 

“We have three kids from a previous marriage and our own daughter and we host family dinner every week,” says Kendall. “During the week when we have family nights, we love doing movie nights — and we do game nights in the bar area so we needed more seating there.”

To add more seating, their previous sofa was replaced with a navy sectional with a low profile that expanded the feel of the space. Textures were incorporated throughout design — from a hide rug and a Moroccan throw, to stone elements with the marble nesting tables and wood in the hanging tobacco baskets (an ode to NC). The artistic feature of the space is a rustic wood and marble fireplace crafted from wood that was sourced from a plantation owned by a Civil War general in South Carolina. Berk and Kell kept their 14-month old daughter in mind, staying away from harsh corners with the layered, marble nesting tables with round edges. 

Their home feels relaxed, intimate and welcoming and House of Nomad’s in love with this space. This was a fulfilling project for House of Nomad, crafting designs and floor plans to represent the unique personalities of these clients — a space they love coming home to and welcoming their friends into. 

“Because of Sydney’s work, pediatric residents will be in the area and constantly drop by and I love to do bourbon tastings for anyone who likes bourbon. We have kegerator and keep two local beers on tap at all time. Not only are we are supporting local breweries but for out of town friends, we get to give then a little tasting of the great Charlotte brewery scene,” Kendall says.

A bourbon aficionado, Kendall’s most recent feat is trying her hand at smoking cocktails. Her most recent drink is an old fashioned crafted with rosemary and burning an orange peel, which she says brings out more of the flavor of the bourbon.

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For daily design inspo, follow along on our Instagram!

Hanging Chair Tutorial

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It’s no surprise that we are obsessed with hanging chairs! They add a relaxed, comfortable vibe to a space and tons of personality and we find our clients always jump for them, both for indoor or outdoor rooms!

The trick for these chairs is mounting them properly to the ceiling. After trial and error by our install guru, Jim Drake, we’ve created a tutorial for the proper steps to hang these chairs — and have them stay put in your ceiling! Happy mounting!

1. Source the Right Chair

It’s a tie for our favorite hanging chair between the Serena & Lily chair and Selamat’s version (pictured here!). While natural rattan is the color we’ve opted for in our designs, here’s a stunning black and white option we can’t wait to work into a space. And if your budget is in a pinch, this chair is a great option. (If hanging a chair is a little too much for you, go for this option for the same laid-back vibe without the mounting process!)

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2. Collect Your Hardware

There is a lot of variety with what hardware hanging chairs arrive with — some come mounted to a rope or with a kit, some don’t include any hardware at all.

  • A good place to start is this mounting kit. Whatever you do, purchase bolts/mounting materials rated for human weight and our suggestion is for 350-500 pounds, just to be safe.

  • Make sure you have a stud finder on hand.

  • You’ll need string/rope to measure chair height with (anything you have on hand will work!).

  • Once you know the length (see step 4 below), go grab heavy-duty rope and/or a chain needed for your space and chair.

3. Find a Stud

The number one most important thing is that you get the eyelet screw (included in the above kit) into a stud or a ceiling joist. Studs are usually spaced 24” apart or so, but find the exact location with your stud finder and mark it.

Warning: Some of the kits sold for ceiling mount say they can be secured to the drywall, but we don’t recommend going with that. You don’t want your chair to rip out of the ceiling with a glass of wine in hand!

This means that aesthetically, you might have to play around with the feel of the space within a foot or so. But let’s be honest, safety is paramount. Sometimes there is not anything for the eyelet screw to grab into right where you pictured the chair. But don’t skimp on this step — the chair has to be placed in a ceiling joist or stud.

Once marked, go ahead and drill your eyelet screw into the ceiling.

4. Measure the Height of your Chair Mount

To determine the proper length of chain or rope for mounting, try attaching a string or rope to the eyelet screw in the ceiling — or to the carabiner if you use the Amazon kit — and then to the chair. A trick is to put something under the chair to take off slack, so you can gauge how much length you are going to be using. An end table, nightstand or something similar is perfect for this step!

Trick of the trade: Most chairs come with rope standard for an eight foot ceiling, but keep in mind — ropes have give to them! A common mistake is hanging the chair too low. A misconception here is that you hang it at seat level. But if you do, it’s going to sink about four inches when you take a seat.

  • Measure where you think it should hang and subtract 3-4 inches from it. This should give you the perfect length. (Usually, this is about 25” inches above the ground.)

Once you figure out the correct length for the rope/chain, head to the local hardware store. They will cut chain down to the inch you need — and make sure it’s heavy weight bearing rope and/or chain.

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5. Mount Away!

Using your carefully marked ceiling placement and custom-cut chain, and extra carabiners in your kit — get mounting and happy swinging!

A special thanks to Jim, who passed along on these tips and hangs each and every hanging chair for our clients!